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A New Space for Modern Device

It’s a been a long time since we updated our blog since we have been working overtime to get things moved and production back in action. Here are some shots of the new space along with a little commentary.

Dig the clerestory windows. Not commonly found in American manufacturing spaces these days. Nice 18 foot ceilings or so. (I’m guessing.) The space has been rehabbed and is very clean.

We put one of the larger parts bin shelves on wheels, the better to rearrange the space for our open-house party.

Plenty of space for a pick-and-place machine, if we decide to go that way, and the 480 power is already in. Actually that giant box is a transformer with more than a bit of hum. Flip and Sebastian, our production people, never seem to notice (because the sound track never gets that low).

They are jazzed to be able to shut the old folks up in the office and enjoy the tunes. The office also has high ceilings and some great windows, with a mundane view of a residential street. All in all beautiful natural lighting in a very nice office and work space. We can try out some larger projects if we want and generally have a lot of breathing room again. Our old space at the Steelyard had filled to the point that any growth had to occur in the vertical dimension, and even that was looking very crowded.

In the hallway out front of our new home is New Harvest Coffee Roasters, which also maintains a little retail shop in their space. The coffee does not get fresher than this. Yes those are bags of beans in the picture.

The building, called Hope Artiste Village (slightly unfortunate name IMO) is home to lots of small wood and metal workers, caterers, three bakers, a farmer’s market in the winter, several sculptors, along with some live-work space and some office and retail oriented spaces. It’s been fun meeting people and I have a tech swap going on with a wood sculptor already.

All in all, we’re very excited about our new space, which costs about the same as a closet sized one-bedroom apartment in the less tony parts of New York City. We think this space should easily take Modern Device through the next three to four years or more.